Recycling

Just Say No to Plastic Straws

We understand. We really do. Straws are fun; convenient; and we use them in every beverage. Who knew that these seemingly benign modern conveniences are also hazards and dangerous? The PLASTIC straw is a particularly sneaky, insidious hazard to life, as we know it. Consider the following facts:

  1. In the US alone, we consume over 500 million straws per day
  2. We (yes, you) use these straws for about 20 minutes, and then toss them.
  3. Plastic is NOT It breaks down into smaller and smaller pieces. Think plastic particles in food – ingested by fish, animals, and humans.
  4. Plastic makes up 90% of all trash floating in the ocean.
  5. Most plastic contains polypropylene and BPA. This can leak chemicals into liquids and is linked to obesity, on-set puberty, and some cancers.

What can you and your kids do?

  • Simply request “NO STRAW” at any restaurant, including fast food places.
  • For small children – use sippy cups; Juice boxes and plastic straws can be replaced by simply pouring juice or liquid into reusable cups with reusable straws.
  • Buy paper straws, easily found at stores: Target; Walmart; Stop & Shop; Big Y and online.
  • Use straws made out of bamboo, steel, reusable plastic, even glass.
  • .Carry your own bottle, with straws built into the design
  • Take your own juice and beverages with you and your kids, wherever you go. Plan it; pack it.
  • Watch the movie: “Bag It: is your life too plastic? (bagtitmovie.com )
  • Take the pledge: onelessstraw.org
  • Do your own research: https://get-green-now.com/environmental-impact-plastic-straws/ ; http://www.plasticpollutioncoalition.org/ http://www.ecocycle.org/bestrawfreepledge
  • Biodegradable straws at The Ashfield Lake House
    Biodegradable straws at The Ashfield Lake House

    Some people absolutely need straws (certain ability challenges; very young children) – we can help support a better approach so those who need to sip, can do so, with confidence and commitment to a better, healthier environment.

Grateful to our community of recyclers.

This article was writen by Share the Warmth committee member Carol J. Lebold.

 

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